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7 Sunday Rituals for a successful week

There are a few reasons that things just don’t get done during the week… stuff pops up, life happens, I get it. You cannot prepare yourself for every little thing. However, there are some insurances you can implement, to ensure that when life gets crazy and you have little time, mentally and physically you are prepared (as best you can be). Here are 7 Sunday rituals that I think we should all make a habit of…

1. Schedule the week ahead I’m talking about work commitments, to-do lists, social occasions, workouts, time to yourself… everything you can think of! Add to this as the week goes on, but at least this way when a friend asks you to walk or dinner, you know what you have on and aren’t racking your brain madly, stressing yourself out and probably over-committing yourself! Another great thing to do here is look at your schedule and visualise a successful week!

2. Meal plan – this might seem obsessive, but I am talking about doing it from an economic and time-efficient perspective. If you plan your meals, you will have everything you need to cook them in your kitchen, and therefore not waste time going to-and-from the shops multiple times unnecessarily, or fall victim to the quick and easy take-out option because you don’t have all those beautiful fruits and veggies for what you really would like to make. Write out a list of 3 or 4 meals you want to cook for the next few days to 1 week, and that way you have the ingredients sitting there, know what you are having each night, and hopefully have leftovers for the next day’s lunch!

3. Food-shop – get in early to avoid the Sunday afternoon crowds! Sunday’s are pretty notorious for a stock-up. Better yet, head to your local farmers market for produce and leave the pantry items etc. for a quick supermarket run. Make an occasion of it! Take your partner, kids or meet a friend for a walk, chat and grocery haul. Once you have planned your meals, you can get everything you need so that a healthy meal is just waiting to be made from your fridge or pantry.

4. Food-prep – This one doesn’t have to be carefully planned, measured and portioned meals. Make some staples so that each morning you can throw some things together. I like to roast some veggies (sweet potato and cruciferous veg), boil some rice or quinoa, prepare a salad dressing/dip and make a sweet treat like my raw chocolate, bliss balls or granola. That’s me at a minimum most weeks. Sometimes I might whip up some almond milk,  others I might also make a batch of lentil bolognese or soup to keep in the fridge for a quick meal. You work out what works for you – but it helps to have these on hand for easy salad bowls, and those times when you are craving a sweet treat.

5. Something restorative for you – there are so many options, and I am not going to suggest them all because as I always say, that makes the wonderful things stressful! Whether it be exercise, meditation, yin yoga, spending 10 minutes dry brushing, a face mask at home, or time set aside to read a book… choose one that speaks to you and use it as your way of treating yourself before another busy week.

6. See friends or family over breakfast or tea not wine and cheese – self-explanatory. The weekend is a time to relax and refresh, but also a time to spend socialising. I get it, sometimes it’s hard to be healthy, as eating and drinking is “social”. But if you can’t or don’t want to choose a healthy cafe to venture to with a friend, get social in other ways- a hike or coastal walk to catch up with a friend, see your mum over juice or tea, a movie with your own healthy treats tucked away in your handbag, a picnic or BYO healthy plate dinner with the girls… don’t start Monday trying to undo the sins of the weekend.

7. Bed by 10pm – sleep is so integral to our body, not just our minds. It is required for proper detoxification, hormone function, metabolism, optimal energy levels etc. Don’t start your week already trying to play catch up! There is no such thing as catch-up sleep! Be in bed at 10pm to start a healthy sleep routine for the week ahead. Studies show that a good sleep regimen is linked to maintaining healthier weight, eating patterns and stress levels. Do not disregard this key component of a healthy lifestyle.

The Inertia Feature: Sleep Tricks To Have You Ready For Dawn Patrol

I am so excited to be contributing to The Inertia Health section again! These sleep tips are essential to a good nights sleep whether it be for an early surf, an early yoga class, a solo run, a gym session or merely just a fresh start to your day! Find out why sleep is so crucial to good health and how you can maximise your zzzzzz time here.

Jet lag, Sleep & Weight loss

Having just come back from a month overseas in various time zones, I am reminded of the much-dreaded symptoms of jet lag. You likely know the irritated, anxious and exhaustive effects of a lack of sleep! Concentration wavers, energy levels plummet, appetite is haywire, digestion is compromised and your mood is less than pleasant. So, why does this happen?

The body’s sleep cycle plays a crucial role in many important bodily processes including hormonal regulation, brain function and mood, temperature, energy levels, heart rate, appetite, digestion and detoxification. These functions are specifically timed on our body’s 24-hour internal clock; they kick in or switch off according to night and day. Abrupt changes in time zones due to travel can upset our natural circadian rhythm, therefore disrupting this carefully timed schedule. Welcome jet lag!

The importance of sleep cannot be underestimated. When considering weight loss or maintenance, people tend to focus on good quality food and regular exercise. Sleep is often overlooked. However, a look at the above listed bodily processes it regulates shows just how important sleep is to our health and the factors that influence our weight. In fact, a lack of sleep actually leads to heightened appetite and less feelings of satisfaction after a meal due to its relationship with the hormones Ghrelin and Leptin.

Ghrelin and Leptin both act on the brain to regulate appetite and produce either feelings of hunger or satiety. Leptin is made by the fat cells and is also produced when we consume fat such as avocadoes, healthy oils and nuts. It switches off appetite, creating feelings of satisfaction (this is why consumption of healthy fats are known to suppress appetite). Ghrelin on the other hand, is a gut hormone made in the stomach, which enhances hunger by turning on appetite when the stomach is empty. A lack of sleep confuses this process and actually decreases levels of Leptin while increasing the “hunger hormone” Ghrelin. This is one of the main reasons why sleep is so important for weight loss/maintenance.

Ghrelin stimulates appetite, causing you to feel hungry even when you don’t necessarily need food! I felt this whilst I was overseas adjusting from one time zone to the next… in the middle of the night I woke up to abrupt hunger pangs for no particular reason – I had had a good dinner, it was dark and quiet, it was not time for breakfast – I simply was having a restless sleep and my rhythm was out of whack!

A holiday should be about rest and recuperation from daily life at home. This however is not always the case! Vacations often involve late nights, exhausting days, increased alcohol consumption and indulgence aplenty! This is also part of life and the travel experience. However, where possible, one of the best things you can do for yourself is to try your best to maintain a healthy sleep regiment before, during and after travel…

Tips to minimise the effects of jet lag

It is what you do prior to and on the flight that can be the most effective to ensuring it isn’t your worst sleepless nightmare! To minimise the negative effects of travel…

  • Ensure adequate sleep in the lead-up to travel, an existing sleep deficit will only worsen the situation
  • Avoid caffeine and alcohol just before and during the flight
  • Keep well hydrated on board with water. Bring your own empty stainless steel water bottle and fill it up once past security from a water fountain to consume on flight when the cabin crew aren’t around
  • During flight eat and sleep according to your destinations time zones – setting your watch once you board the plane is a great way to sync up
  • Prepare your own healthy meals/snacks to avoid processed, sugar-laden, excessively salty airline food, which can interfere with sleep, digestion and mood. Take healthy fats like raw unsalted nuts to increase Leptin production
  • Eyeshades and earplugs (or relaxing music) may help you sleep during the flight
  • When you arrive get fresh air and sunshine as soon as you land to optimise melatonin production. This is also a great way to wake up in general – 15 minutes of morning sunlight will send a strong message to your internal clock that it is daytime!

Tips for restful sleep

Regular sleep patterns have such a powerful effect on appetite control and weight. To ensure a good night sleep during and post travel try these tips…

  • Do not use computers or phones 1 hour prior to sleep
  • Avoid liquids 1-2 hours before bed. Sip chamomile tea 2 hours prior to induce calm
  • Take a hot bath/shower 1-2 hours before bed – the temperature drop signals to your body its time for sleep
  • Sniff lavender in bed to bring on sleepiness
  • Take large diaphragmatic breaths to unwind, either in bed or just prior
  • Keep the alarm clock out of sight so you aren’t constantly checking it
  • Keep a pen and paper next to your bed in case you remember something you MUST jot down. This saves you getting up or using your brightly lit phone! And saves you the worry of remembering whatever it is in your sleepy state
  • Stick to a consistent bed time and waking up schedule to form solid sleep patterns
  • Sleep in total darkness
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